"Great sleep dreams seduce and sometimes torture. The best ones can almost break our heart when we awaken from them and find ourselves back…here. I’m talking about those exceedingly rare dreams we’ve all had over the course of our lives so splendid or sexy or momentous or idyllic or every one of those things combined that we never want them to end and are genuinely distraught on waking and these luminous moments and images immediately begin to vanish into our never-very trustworthy memory. No romantic moments in waking life have ever been greater than those in that one walk-in-the- forest dream you had when you were 19. The dream with the 101% perfect mate who evaporated like morning mist as soon as you woke. Or the magnificent candlelight meal in that Austrian gasthaus where both the mood and the meal tasted like the gods had prepared them only for you. And remember the bliss you felt on meeting your dead parent (brother, sister, best friend…) in some unimportant place—an empty parking lot or a small rural airport. You sat together just like the old days and spoke about things that brought you peace and a heart-filling reminder of the strength of the love that lost person once had for you when they were alive."

— Jonathan Carroll  ( from the new novella)

(Source: browndresswithwhitedots)

"The fact that our heart yearns for something Earth can’t supply is proof that Heaven must be our home."

— C.S. Lewis (via actorslifeforme)

(via alifelivedwell)

"Love is what we are born with. Fear is what we have learned here. The spiritual journey is the unlearning of fear and the acceptance of love back into our hearts."

— Marianne Williamson  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: childrenofthetao, via thatkindofwoman)

radtracks:

i’m looking through you // the beatles

your lips are moving, i cannot hear
your voice is soothing but the words aren’t clear
you don’t sound different, i’ve learned the game
i’m looking through you, you’re not the same

(via jazzcatter)

mediclopedia:

Plastic in Implantable Medical Devices is Not Suitable
Scientists have discovered a previously unrecognized way that degradation can occur in silicone-urethane plastics that are often considered for use in medical devices. Their study, published in ACS’ journal Macromolecules, could have implications for device manufacturers considering use of these plastics in the design of some implantable devices, including cardiac defibrillation leads. 
Kimberly Chaffin, Marc Hillmyer, Frank Bates, from the Univ. of Minnesota, and colleagues explain that some implanted biomedical devices, such as pacemakers and defibrillators, have parts made of a plastic consisting of polyurethane and silicone. While these materials have been extensively studied for failure due to interaction with oxygen, no published study has looked at interaction with water as a potential failure mechanism in this class of materials. In a cardiac lead application, these materials may be used as a coating on the electrical wires or “leads” that carry electric current from the battery in the device to the heart. Surgeons implant pacemakers in 600,000 people worldwide and defibrillators in 100,000 people in the U.S. each year. Since these implants must function reliably for years, the scientists wanted to determine whether the plastic material was suitable for long-term implants.

mediclopedia:

Plastic in Implantable Medical Devices is Not Suitable

Scientists have discovered a previously unrecognized way that degradation can occur in silicone-urethane plastics that are often considered for use in medical devices. Their study, published in ACS’ journal Macromolecules, could have implications for device manufacturers considering use of these plastics in the design of some implantable devices, including cardiac defibrillation leads. 

Kimberly Chaffin, Marc Hillmyer, Frank Bates, from the Univ. of Minnesota, and colleagues explain that some implanted biomedical devices, such as pacemakers and defibrillators, have parts made of a plastic consisting of polyurethane and silicone. While these materials have been extensively studied for failure due to interaction with oxygen, no published study has looked at interaction with water as a potential failure mechanism in this class of materials. In a cardiac lead application, these materials may be used as a coating on the electrical wires or “leads” that carry electric current from the battery in the device to the heart. Surgeons implant pacemakers in 600,000 people worldwide and defibrillators in 100,000 people in the U.S. each year. Since these implants must function reliably for years, the scientists wanted to determine whether the plastic material was suitable for long-term implants.

sundaypostsecrets:

Secret from PostSecret.com

sundaypostsecrets:

Secret from PostSecret.com

(Source: postsecret.com)

(via aluckymom)